swede
  • vegetables
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Swede

Although the part of the swede we eat is not green, it is still from the same family as the rest of our greens.

It is a root vegetable which is a cross between a cabbage and a turnip, thought to have originated from Scandinavia or Russia and introduced to England around the end of the 18th century.

The phrase never judge by appearances is never more appropriate than for swede – its rough, slightly purple exterior hides the golden, sweet tasting flesh inside. A delicious addition to casseroles and soups, swede is great for cooking on a budget as it’ll make your meat go further, while giving the dish its own special flavour.

Buying and storing

Look for firm, solid swede – some marks on the exterior are normal.

Swede Ice Cream copy
Aaron Craze’s swede ice cream
VIEW THIS RECIPE >
Honey Roast Turnip and Pumpkin
Honey roast turnip and pumpkin
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Swede rosti
Swede rosti with poached eggs and crisp bacon
VIEW THIS RECIPE >
Roast swede wedges with parmesan
Roast swede wedges with parmesan
VIEW THIS RECIPE >

HOW TO COOK

Peel and chop as required. Steam or boil diced swede and serve mashed on its own or with potato and carrots for extra colour; roasting swede concentrates its delicious sweet flavour – toss in a little oil, season and roast for around 30 mins. Add swede to potatoes and mash with butter for a tasty topping for Shepherds, Cottage or fish pie.

Swede LOVES

Butter, black pepper, parmesan, other roots such as carrots and parsnips

IN SEASON

Year round.
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